Supplements That Support A Stronger Heart

There are several ways to strengthen a failing heart with nutrient supplements. Because patients with congestive heart failure (CGF) have a high prevalence of malnutrition generally, research has investigated the micronutrient deficiencies that are associated with heart muscle function and those that cause the condition.

We know that vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12 and C help provide energy and are important for heart muscle and nerve metabolism.

Vitamin E has an antioxidant protection effect.

The minerals magnesium, selenium, zinc and copper are cofactors for metabolism and energy production. L-carnitine, coenzymeQ10, creatine and thiamine are cofactors for heart muscle energy production.

Peak CoQSol10 CF

Coenzyme Q10 is essential for good health. Our cells use it to produce energy the body needs for basic functions, including cell growth and maintenance. The problem is, you can start seeing declines in your CoQ10 levels as early as your 20s plus… MORE⟩⟩

Micronutrient Supplements  

  • Magnesium: Needed for energy metabolism and protein synthesis of heart muscle tissue. Low magnesium promotes inflammation [5], and is linked with increased death rates from heart failure [6].  In any case, it can be dangerous to be low in this crucial mineral. A government study shows that 68 percent of Americans do not even consume the recommended daily intake of magnesium (420 mg a day for adult males) and that 19 percent of Americans do not even consume half of the RDI (recommended daily intake) of magnesium. [7] Magnesium citrate or magnesium malate 500 mg twice daily can overcome nutritional causes of deficiency.
  • Potassium: Needed for effective muscle contraction. I recommend a high-potassium diet of 5,000 mg daily. [8] Learn more here.
  • Selenium (200 mcg/day) & zinc (50 mg/day): [12]: Growing scientific evidence [13] suggests an association between heart failure and low levels of these micronutrients. Have your copper levels checked, too.
  • B vitamins: Take vitamin B complex and at least 200 mg of vitamin B1 (thiamin) daily [14]
  • Vitamin D: Make sure your levels are to a blood level of 60 ng/ml or simply supplement with 2,000 to 5,000 IU daily. Low vitamin D levels will contribute to myocardial dysfunction [15] [16] of CHF.

Editor’s note: There are numerous safe and natural ways to decrease your risk of blood clots including the 25-cent vitamin, the nutrient that acts as a natural blood thinner and the powerful herb that helps clear plaque. To discover these and more, click here for Hushed Up Natural Heart Cures and Common Misconceptions of Popular Heart Treatments!

 


[1] Witte KK, Clark AL, Cleland JG. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Jun 1;37(7):1765-74.

[2] McKeag NA, McKinley MC, Woodside JV, Harbinson MT, McKeown PP.The role of micronutrients in heart failure. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jun;112(6):870-86.

[3] Witte KK, Clark AL. Chronic heart failure and multiple micronutrient supplementation: realistic hope or idealistic conjecture? Heart Fail Monit. 2005;4(4):123-9.

[4] Witte KK, Nikitin NP, Parker AC, von Haehling S, Volk HD, Anker SD, Clark AL, Cleland JG. The effect of micronutrient supplementation on quality-of-life and left ventricular function in elderly patients with chronic heart failure. Eur Heart J. 2005 Nov;26(21):2238-44.

[5] Maier J, Malpuech-Brugere C, Zimowska W, Rayssiguier Y, Mazur A. Low magnesium promotes endothelial cell dysfunction: implications for atherosclerosis, inflammation and thrombosis. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2004 May 24;1689(1):13-21.

[6] Seelig MS. Interrelationship of magnesium and congestive heart failure. Wien Med Wochenschr 2000 150(15-16):335-41.

[7] King D, Mainous A 3rd, Geesey M, Woolson R. Dietary magnesium and C-reactive protein levels. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Jun 24(3):166-71

[8] Personal notes taken from the American Academy of Anti-aging Medicine fellowship module II training, 2012.

[9] Victor Soukoulis, MD, PhD; Jamil B. Dihu, DO; Michael Sole, MD; Stefan D. Anker, MD, PhD; John Cleland, MD; Gregg C. Fonarow, MD; Marco Metra, MD; Evasio Pasini, MD; Theresa Strzelczyk, APN, CNS; Heinrich Taegtmeyer, MD, DPhil; Mihai Gheorghiade, MD. Micronutrient Deficiencies: An Unmet Need in Heart Failure.  J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009;54(18):1660-1673. Online at: http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1140151

[10] McKeag NA, McKinley MC, Woodside JV, Harbinson MT, McKeown PP.The role of micronutrients in heart failure. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jun;112(6):870-86.

[11] Personal notes taken from the American Academy of Anti-aging Medicine fellowship module II training, 2012.

[12] Victor Soukoulis, MD, PhD; Jamil B. Dihu, DO; Michael Sole, MD; Stefan D. Anker, MD, PhD; John Cleland, MD; Gregg C. Fonarow, MD; Marco Metra, MD; Evasio Pasini, MD; Theresa Strzelczyk, APN, CNS; Heinrich Taegtmeyer, MD, DPhil; Mihai Gheorghiade, MD. Micronutrient Deficiencies: An Unmet Need in Heart Failure.  J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009;54(18):1660-1673. Online at: http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1140151

[13] McKeag NA, McKinley MC, Woodside JV, Harbinson MT, McKeown PP.The role of micronutrients in heart failure. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jun;112(6):870-86.

[14] Victor Soukoulis, MD, PhD; Jamil B. Dihu, DO; et al. Micronutrient Deficiencies: An Unmet Need in Heart Failure.  J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009;54(18):1660-1673.  http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1140151

[15] Zittermann A, Schleithoff SS, Tenderich G, Berthold HK, Körfer R, Stehle P. Low vitamin D status: a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure? J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Jan 1;41(1):105-12.

[16] Szabó B, Merkely B, Takács I.  [The role of vitamin D in the development of cardiac failure]. Orv Hetil. 2009 Jul 26;150(30):1397-402.[Article in Hungarian]

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Dr. Michael Cutler

By Dr. Michael Cutler

Dr. Michael Cutler is a graduate of Tulane University School of Medicine and is a board-certified family physician with more than 20 years of experience. He serves as a medical liaison to alternative and traditional practicing physicians. His practice focuses on an integrative solution to health problems. Dr. Cutler is a sought-after speaker and lecturer on experiencing optimum health through natural medicines and founder of the original Easy Health Options™ newsletter — an advisory on natural healing therapies and nutrients. His current practice is San Diego Integrative Medicine, near San Diego, California.