Bladder Support

Carolyn Gretton

The surprising habit that weakens your pelvic floor (and we all do it!)

Sucking in our stomachs can seem normal, especially for women. But it turns out it’s not exactly healthy for us to be holding in our stomachs all the time. Read on to discover the dark side of “stomach gripping” and why it might have you running to the nearest restroom faster…

Miguel Leyva

Risky drugs: From bladder trouble to vision damage

For consumers who suffer lifelong side effects after prescription drug use, the question that often arises first is: How could medication approved by the FDA cause them serious harm? A drug used to treat a painful bladder condition is just one example of what happens when the system goes terribly wrong…

Joyce Hollman

Overactive bladder: Causes, risk factors and fixes

Overactive bladder (OAB) is just what it sounds like: A condition that causes the sudden and frequent urge to urinate. OAB isn’t uncommon, affecting 16 percent of men and 33 percent of women. The risk for OAB increases with age, but you shouldn’t consider it to be just an inevitable consequence of aging. If you’re experiencing problems, consider these common causes…

Tracey G. Ingram, AuD

What every woman should know about bladder leaks

Bladder leaks are embarrassing and can really cramp your lifestyle. But as common as the problem is, it’s not easy to talk about. Worse, some women accept urinary incontinence as something they just have to tolerate. That doesn’t have to be the case…

Joyce Hollman

Drugs that treat colds, bladder leaks, Parkinson’s and more increase Alzheimer’s risk

Anticholinergics, also called antispasmodics, treat everything from Parkinson’s to COPD and asthma to irritable bowel syndrome. Some are even found in over-the-counter allergy medications. But at least three recent studies point to a strong connection between anticholinergic use and cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s.

Jenny Smiechowski

Can probiotics put a plug in urinary incontinence?

When it comes to staying healthy, it seems like all roads lead back to your microbiome. Everything from anxiety to Parkinson’s to diabetes to depression to multiple sclerosis to cancer has been linked to the microbes you have (or don’t have) in your body. And now there’s another common condition in which your microbiome may make a huge difference… urinary incontinence.