Prescription drugs

Joyce Hollman

‘Loneliness’ prescriptions are putting older adults in jeopardy

Whether it’s empty nest syndrome or other life changes, it’s not uncommon for people to assume loneliness goes hand-in-hand with getting older. But that’s a misconception that’s leading to a problem: seeing bouts of loneliness as an excuse for doctors to prescribe drugs that are putting seniors in danger.

Dr. Elizabeth Klodas MD, FACC

Wegovy: What you can expect from the ‘new’ weight loss drug

If you were paying attention to the news this summer, you probably heard about Wegovy™, a “new” drug just approved for weight loss. It’s an injection that you self-administer once a week under the skin. And it works! Sounds great, but before you give it a try, here are all the details…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Are you taking one of these medications that increase fall risk?

Chances are, if you’re 65 years of age or older, you’re currently taking at least one prescription drug that could cause a dangerous fall, a hip fracture, head trauma and worse. Coinciding with the rise in medication is the rate of death from falls. Here’s a list of the worst offenders…

Joyce Hollman

The biological reason most drugs don’t relieve pain in women

Functional pain refers to pain that occurs without injury. Migraines and fibromyalgia fall into this category. Turns out more women suffer this kind of pain and now we know why. For starters, a female hormone acts on sensory pain receptors and may ramp up that stimuli. To make matters worse, certain pain treatments can kick it into high gear.

Joyce Hollman

The blood pressure drug that makes blood pressure worse

A common class of blood pressure medicine has come under scrutiny recently. It’s designed to keep calcium from damaging your vascular smooth muscle cells so your blood flows freely and your BP stays in the healthy range. But research is showing that it actually causes damage that can make your BP worse…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Huge study review reveals the big fat lies about statins

Roughly 36 million people in the U.S. alone take cholesterol-lowering medications, also known as statin drugs. Yet, with the massive number of statin prescriptions doctors write, is there truly evidence that they save lives? New revelations are that inconsistencies and contradictory evidence has been swept under the rug…