Depression

Carolyn Gretton

Feeling like leisure time is a waste of time risks health and happiness

We have more leisure time than ever, between 36 and 40 hours a week by some estimates. But we live in a society that makes us feel like every moment must be a productive one. Once you believe that, and internalize the message that leisure time is a waste of time, research shows you’re going to be more depressed and less happy, unless you think of it this way…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Want to feel better fast? Try a canine cuddle

From watching funny pet videos to relaxing with our favorite pooch, pets make us laugh, make us smile, and make us feel better. That’s why doctors and hospitals have long enlisted therapy dogs to help patients, whether they’re recovering from a physical injury or need emotional support. Here’s how your pet can help you feel better fast…

Joyce Hollman

Alzheimer’s to stroke: What playing an instrument does for your brain

At any given moment, I can listen to the right tune to help me feel calmer, happier, more focused or primed for sleep. But playing music also improves your life in multiple ways. In fact, learning to play a musical instrument is well worth the effort, especially for your brain, even if you don’t start learning until you’re an older adult…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Essential oils really work with the help of a ‘brain vitamin’

Essential oils have long been used to boost physical and emotional health. Some may speed wound healing, lower blood pressure and even attack the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. But the scientific community has claimed it was a “placebo effect.” Well, that’s all over now that the mechansim by which they boost health and mood has been uncovered…

Joyce Hollman

‘Loneliness’ prescriptions are putting older adults in jeopardy

Whether it’s empty nest syndrome or other life changes, it’s not uncommon for people to assume loneliness goes hand-in-hand with getting older. But that’s a misconception that’s leading to a problem: seeing bouts of loneliness as an excuse for doctors to prescribe drugs that are putting seniors in danger.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Tai chi may help stroke survivors beat depression, anxiety and sleep problems

For approximately one-third of stroke survivors, the future can feel less than rosy. That’s because afterwards, many face three common problems: anxiety, sleep problems and depression. But there’s hope and help available from an ancient practice that’s already been proven to be good for both the mind and the body…