Heart Disease

Carolyn Gretton

When diabetes leads to the worst heart trouble

People with diabetes who have no other risk factors for heart disease are five times more likely to die of heart disease than those without. Researchers now know a critical factor that if caught early enough can help dial the heart health risks down…

Joyce Hollman

Sleep apnea: A much bigger worry than just snoring

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that causes a person to stop breathing multiple times during the night. It often goes untreated in people at high risk for cardiovascular disease, although up to 80 percent of people with heart disease also have OSA. Here’s everything you should know about this serious health threat…

Virginia Tims-Lawson

What a single cup of veggies can do for your heart

If there is one health problem that’s most likely to steal your life, it’s one that affects your heart. You could start taking a laundry list of medications now or adopt a super healthy lifestyle. Or you can discover the surprisingly significant impact one cup of the right vegetables has on your heart…

Carolyn Gretton

The connection between darker skin and vitamin D that harms hearts

If you have dark skin and tend to spend a lot of unprotected time in the sun, you may think you’re safe from vitamin D deficiency. But research shows the opposite may be true. This is why researchers are recommending that people with dark skin add vitamin D to their diet to help protect their heart health…

Carolyn Gretton

How breastfeeding makes women’s hearts healthier

Maybe you’re a soon-to-be new mom deciding whether to breastfeed or not, or a mom who breastfed years ago. In either case you may excited to learn mothers benefit just as much from breastfeeding as their babies do. It turns out breastfeeding may lower the risk of certain diseases over the long term for moms, including cardiovascular disease…

Carolyn Gretton

2 types of stress putting women at high risk for heart disease

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is more prevalent in men than in women, but that doesn’t mean women are safe from it. Mature women are at especially high risk of developing CHD, partly because of low estrogen, and partly because of the weight of two specific types of psychological stress…