Heart Disease

Joyce Hollman

12 habits that pack on dangerous belly fat

Not all fat is created equal. Belly fat, also called visceral fat, causes unhealthy chemical reactions in your body. Fat around your midsection puts you at greater risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke than being obese or overweight. To lower your risks, ditch these 12 habits…

Joyce Hollman

Experts validate 5 factors that drastically affect heart disease risk

If you have a family history of heart disease, you might assume you’re a time bomb waiting to go off and there’s little you can do about it. But you’d be wrong. As much as 90 percent of our risk comes from factors within our control. And some of those factors have recieved an updated seal of approval from the experts, validating their potential to save your life…

Carolyn Gretton

The surprisingly big benefits of starting exercise later in life

You may believe there comes a point when taking up exercise won’t make any difference to your health. But don’t give up just yet. Research in more than 30,000 people indicates that becoming physically active later in life can be almost as good for a longer, healthier life as having exercised consistently for years…

Joyce Hollman

Walnuts crack the code to longer years and less disease

Certain foods have a reputation as superfoods, meaning they possess particularly heathy attributes that confer improved health and even longer life to those who eat them. You can include them as part of healthy diet or, in the case of this one, the worse your diet is, the bigger the benefits you’ll see…

Virginia Tims-Lawson

When erectile dysfunction is a three-alarm warning for your heart

Erectile dysfunction is a subject most men don’t want to talk about. After all, many men take it as another sign, along with laugh lines and a receding hairline, that they’re just getting older. But if you’re experiencing problems in the bedroom that you’ve been ignoring, the results of a study of over 95,000 men in Australia may be a wake-up call for you…

Carolyn Gretton

Missing link explains how heart disease can start in the gut

There’s a reason we’ve learned to trust our gut instincts. Research has revealed that it works for the body like a second brain and that its effects on total body health can reach far beyond its intestinal confines. That’s why when scientists had a gut feeling about its connection to heart disease, they couldn’t shake it until they discovered this missing link…