Plant-based diet

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Scientists calculate which foods add or subtract minutes from your life

Don’t you love the advice to eat better? Silly question. In fact, we hate to hear it because, what is better, specifically? Oftentimes, it’s conflicting. And it rarely includes our favorite indulgences. That’s why we struggle to choose and stick to a healthy diet. But would it be easier if you knew which foods added or subtracted minutes from your life?

Carolyn Gretton

The surprising truth about soy and hot flashes

There’s been a lot of confusion about whether soy is good or bad for our well-being. What researchers are discovering is that whole soy foods can actually support brain and heart health. More good news? They may also relieve a particularly irritating symptom of menopause that’s proven especially difficult to manage…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

What should you eat to avoid heart disease?

In the past, dietary advice for a healthy heart has been all about what not to eat. But broad research says there is no indication that any food is poison in terms of cardiovascular risk. It’s a matter of quantity and frequency of consumption. Here’s a simpler way to eat best for your heart…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The foods that decreased frontline workers COVID risks by 73 percent

There’s more proof that food choices matter, and it comes from the front lines: Data from doctors and nurses with extensive exposure to SARS-CO-v2, found that depending on whether you choose high protein, low carbs, more plant foods or fish — risks from COVID-19 could be lowered as much as 73 percent.

Dr. Elizabeth Klodas MD, FACC

How to load up on heart-healthy nutrients at your farmer’s market

One of my favorite rites of spring is browsing aisles of beautiful asparagus, radishes, herbs and lettuces at farmer’s markets. It’s one of the most inspiring ways to cook more heart-healthy foods at home. My favorites contain lots of potassium, calcium and nitrates, which may help improve blood flow, and of course fiber!

Joyce Hollman

Not eating your greens? A greens powder could help

Less than ten percent of us eat enough leafy greens, and it’s making us sick. We either don’t like the taste, find them expensive and don’t like that they may cause gas and bloating. If you want to make healthier choices about what goes in your crisper — but have an easy option as well, here are the healthiest greens and what to look for in a greens powder.