FREE Report - Mother Nature’s Tips, Tricks and Remedies for Cholesterol, Blood Pressure & Blood Sugar

Explore Topics

Cancer

Latest Stories

Joyce Hollman

The most effective strategy against heart disease and cancer

Diet is directly tied to health or disease. That’s why it has been and may always be a topic of research. But when a study comes out every week on this diet or that, how do you quantify it all? Analyze 20 years of studies and the disease-free diet comes to the top…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

4 factors that weigh heavy on breast cancer risk and death

Fat cells release hormones that, especially in postmenopausal women, can fuel breast cancer. But additional factors have been found to significantly stack the odds, whether weight is a factor or not. The good news is you can do simple diagnostics at home to identify these risks and turn them around…

Joyce Hollman

Blood proteins signal cancer 7 years before diagnosis

Despite years of research, the best medicine has to offer is the potential to put some cancers into remission. But if we’ve learned anything about cancer, it’s that the earlier you know, the better. Could seven years be enough to change things for the better?

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Melanoma carries higher genetic risk than previously thought

Under threat of skin cancer, we’ve been warned to avoid the sun or slather up in sunscreen. And unlike other cancers. the idea of genetic risk has been far removed from the likes of melanoma, the most dangerous of the skin cancers. New findings indicate just how wrong medical experts have been.

Carolyn Gretton

The urine test that could save more men from a prostate biopsy

Cancer screenings can help catch disease in its earliest stages. For men though, it’s a process fraught with anxiety. PSA screenings are often inaccurate and lead to unnecessary biopsies that can cause harm. With metastatic cases on the rise, men can finally breath a sigh of relief…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

What works to keep fatty liver inflammation from progressing

Fatty liver has become far too common a health risk, and it’s one that keeps on giving because it can progress to liver cancer with just a few steps in between. The key is stamping out the inflammation before that happens…

«SPONSORED»

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The popular condiment linked to stomach cancer

Sodium is an essential nutrient the body needs — but only in small amounts. The problem is in the typical American diet, there’s no shortage of it, and it doesn’t just raise your blood pressure. It may be the missing link that explains why stomach cancer rates are on the rise.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The strange cancer risk we share with our pets

Cancer doesn’t only strike humans. It can steal away the lives of our pets. In fact, one in three dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime. Research is revealing a strange factor that can make it more likely your dog will be one of the statistics — it’s a risk our pets share with us…

Joyce Hollman

How smokers can live longer at any age

If you’ve been a lifelong smoker, you might question whether it’s even worth the trouble to give up the habit now. A fifteen-year-long study found how to quit so you can live nearly as long as someone who has never picked up a cigarette in their life…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The chemical connection between diet, diabetes and cancer

A study aiming to understand what factors elevate risk in families susceptible to cancer ended up discovering a deeper mechanism linking an essential “energy consumption pathway” to cancer development. Here’s how it works and what activates it…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Why the fight against colon cancer might start in your mouth

In my work, I see the data regularly and know that colon cancer has been on the rise for several years. As more and more research is being carried out to get to the root causes and slow the tide, a disturbing revelation may have just been found in a surprising place — the mouth.

Carolyn Gretton

How heart disease fuels cancer growth

There are a few risk factors that heart disease and cancer have in common, including smoking, diabetes and obesity. But a new connection that has surfaced goes deep inside the body and involves an injured or diseased heart’s release of tiny bubbles that promote the growth of cancer cells.

«SPONSORED»