Virginia Tims-Lawson. FREE Report!

Explore Topics

Breast Cancer

Latest Stories

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Women’s biggest benefit from intermittent fasting: Lower cancer risk

For women, just getting older increases the risk of breast cancer. Being overweight takes it up a few notches. Those odds double down after 50 if you carry extra weight and the change steals your sleep. How can you upset the odds? Change when you eat…

Carolyn Gretton

Poor gut health and the risk of aggressive breast cancer

Investigators have discovered interesting connections between breast cancer and the health of the body’s different microbiomes. In fact, the gut may be just as influential as the breast microbiome when it comes to the risk of aggressive breast cancer…

Carolyn Gretton

The medication that could raise your breast cancer risk

There are a lot of potential risk factors for breast cancer, and researchers are discovering more every year. In fact, they’ve uncovered one that could be linked to medication commonly prescribed for certain psychiatric conditions. Here’s what they know so far…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Only one type of plant-based diet decreases breast cancer risk

Switching to a plant-based diet is one of the best ways to stay healthy, from weight loss to avoiding diabetes. They’ve even been found to guard against cancer. But when it comes to breast cancer, not all plant-based diets are equal…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

How breast cancer and diabetes feed off each other

As scientists will say, just because there seems to be a link doesn’t mean there is, especially without proof. But now, when it comes to diabetes and breast cancer, they’ve got the proof connecting cancer’s sweet tooth and a dangerous feedback loop…

Joyce Hollman

Breast cancer: Why Black and Hispanic women need more vitamin D

Vitamin D has shown positive effects on autoimmune disease, diabetes, heart disease and even COVID-19. Now research shows that Black and Hispanic women, who are normally more susceptible to breast cancer, are safer from the disease if they have adequate levels of vitamin D in their blood.

«SPONSORED»

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Why nuts are a breast cancer survivor’s best friend

Breast cancer isn’t just the most common cancer among women in the United States. It’s also the second leading cause of death. For survivors, recurrence is a nagging fear. But a new tool with significant clout takes that risk way down…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Study says more time in the sun could prevent breast cancer

While your dermatologist will tell you to avoid spending too much time in the sun in order to decrease your risk of skin cancer, research is stacking up that sunlight offers big benefits to your health — especially for women. In fact, the more, the better…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The chemicals fueling the hormones breast cancer cells thrive on

It’s no secret that every day we’re exposed to hundreds, if not thousands of chemicals. And though most chemicals are meant to improve our lives in some way, you may be shocked to learn almost 300 common household chemicals, likely lurking in your home right now, have been found to increase hormone levels to fuel breast cancer…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Bloodroot offers promise against triple-negative breast cancer

One of the most difficult forms of breast cancer you could be up against is known as triple-negative breast cancer. It doesn’t respond to traditional treatments and it’s especially aggressive in African American women. A simple plant compound may lead to more effective treatments…

Carolyn Gretton

Your breast microbiome and breast cancer risk

You’ve probably read a lot about your gut microbiome. But you may not be as aware that other parts of the body have their own microbiomes that are just as important to your health, like the connections between diet, breast microbiome, some supplements and breast cancer risk.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

5 ways exercise helps battle breast cancer

Although it may seem like exercising would be a difficult task for anyone undergoing treatment for breast cancer, according to doctors at Johns Hopkins, it’s one of the best things to do. Not only does it lessen the side effects of treatment, research shows it has a direct impact on treatment outcomes.

«SPONSORED»