A supplement to remember your dreams and sleep deep

I’ve always been fascinated by lucid dreaming. You know, the kind of dreaming where you realize that you’re dreaming during your dream.

Some people spend years teaching themselves how to lucid dream. Eventually, when they get good at it, they get to explore their dreams in a whole new way. Sometimes, they can even change parts of their dream. How cool is that?

I’ve never quite accomplished lucid dreaming myself (as soon as I realize that I’m dreaming, I wake up), but I think you can learn a lot about yourself from your dreams whether they’re lucid or not…

Dreams can offer important insights into what’s going on in our minds and emotions, and help us sort through issues in our lives. The problem is, we usually don’t remember our dreams.

How often do you have a really bizarre, vivid or inspiring dream that you’re sure you’re going to remember? But then when you wake up, it’s long gone.

Luckily, if you see your dreams as a helpful mental and emotional tool like I do, there’s a supplement that could help you remember more of them. It’s nothing strange or dangerous. it’s good old fashioned vitamin B6.

B6 gives your dream retention a boost

A recent study from researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia found that taking a B6 supplement before bed can help you remember your dreams.

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 100 people. Half of them took a B6 supplement before bed for five days in a row and the other half took a placebo.

People who took the B6 supplement reported some amazing differences in their dreams. Before the study started, barely anyone reported remembering their dreams.

But after the study, people taking B6 said they remembered their dreams better. Even as the day went on, the details of their dreams stuck in their brain. Here’s what participants from the study had to say about B6’s impact on their dreams:

“It seems as time went on my dreams were clearer and clearer and easier to remember. I also did not lose fragments as the day went on,” said one study participant.

“My dreams were more real, I couldn’t wait to go to bed and dream!” said another study participant.

Since we spend an average of six years of our lives dreaming, we might as well remember them, right? So, maybe it’s time to start taking a nightly B6…

The benefits of B6: Better dreaming and more

If B6 can help you remember your dreams, it could be the first step toward lucid dreaming. And, believe it or not, lucid dreaming has a bunch of potential benefits. People have used lucid dreaming to overcome nightmares, treat phobias, practice creative problem solving, refine motor skills and even recover from physical trauma.

In the study, people took 240 mg of vitamin B6 right before bed. That’s a very high dose. The current recommended maximum dose of B6 is 100 mg per day, so you probably don’t want to take more than that. Taking too much B6 can have serious side effects, including neurological issues.

If you stick to a healthy dose, you’ll not only reap the benefits of better dreaming, you’ll likely lower your heart disease risk, cancer risk and improve your brain health too.

Or if you prefer to get your B6 from food, there are plenty of options to choose from. The best food sources of B6 are:

  • Chickpeas
  • Red meat
  • Chicken
  • Liver
  • Fish
  • Bananas
  • Spinach
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Oatmeal
  • Wheat bran
  • Soybeans
  • Lentils
  • Pistachios
  • Sunflower seeds

Sources:

  1. Want to remember your dreams? Try taking vitamin B6 — MedicalXpress. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  2. J. Aspy, et al. “Effects of Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) and a B Complex Preparation on Dreaming and Sleep.” — Perceptual and Motor Skills, 2018.
  3. Vitamin B6 Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet — National Institutes of Health. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  4. Food Sources of Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) — Dietitians of Canada. Retrieved May 1, 2018.

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Jenny Smiechowski

By Jenny Smiechowski

Jenny Smiechowski is a Chicago-based freelance writer who specializes in health, nutrition and the environment. Her work has appeared in online and print publications like Chicagoland Gardening magazine, Organic Lifestyle Magazine, BetterLife Magazine, TheFix.com, Hybridcars.com and Seedstock.com.