Heart Attack

Joyce Hollman

Help getting back in the saddle again following heart attack

Following a heart attack, there’s a lot of fear. No one wants to risk going through that experience again. But movement is essential to improving qualtity of life after a heart attack. A simple technique with loads of other proven health benefits is also proving to help survivors get back in the saddle again.

Dr. Elizabeth Klodas MD, FACC

When a heart attack ‘comes out of the blue’

Do you know someone whose heart attack seemed to “come out of the blue? While it’s hard to understand how someone can seem fine one day and suffer a major heart event the next day, it happens. Cardiologist Dr. Elizabeth Klodas explains how, why and what’s lurking below the surface that even a stress test can miss — and how to help guard against it.

Virginia Tims-Lawson

The truth about HDL: ‘Good cholesterol’ isn’t so good

For years we’ve been told to watch our cholesterol, keeping our so-called “bad” cholesterol down and our “good” cholesterol up. But what if that advice was wrong and we’ve been operating under a false sense of security? There’s much more banking on HDL than we ever realized.

Carolyn Gretton

How refined grains stack your odds of heart attack and stroke

It’s no news flash that refined grains like white flour are bad for your health. But while many studies on refined grains have focused on their impact on weight and blood sugar, it turns out they significantly boost our odds for heart attack or stroke. Good news: Whole grains do just the opposite.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Best drink for stroke and heart attack survivors

Even if you’ve survived a heart attack or stroke, your risk of dying prematurely increases. In fact, in the first month after a cardiac incident, risk of death skyrockets, and this risk can remain high for years. The good news: You’re a survivor, and researchers are tirelessly working on ways you can keep it that way.

Tracey G. Ingram, AuD

The difference between surviving a heart attack or not

We’ve seen lots of research about the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle. But how active, or inactive you are, has been found to have a great impact on whether a heart attack kills you on the spot or serves as a mere warning that you need to make some major lifestyle changes.