Longevity

Joyce Hollman

Winter squash: Time to eat this ‘Blue Zone’ food now

Fall is a great time to try all the nutritious varieties of squash. Whether you pick acorn, butternut, or Japanese Kabocha, you’ll be getting your fill of fiber, vitamins, and carotenoids, with few calories and a low carb content. Best of all you may get a life-lengthening boost from this popular ‘blue zone’ superfood!

Carolyn Gretton

How many steps a day really lead to a longer life?

You’ve probably heard that 10,000 steps a day can lead to better health and longer life. But have you ever wondered why 10,000 steps? Truth be told, it was an estimate with little science behind it. Recently, researchers set out to determine exactly how many steps per day are needed for those optimal health benefits. Luckily, you can live a lot longer while walking a lot less…

Joyce Hollman

Walnuts crack the code to longer years and less disease

Certain foods have a reputation as superfoods, meaning they possess particularly heathy attributes that confer improved health and even longer life to those who eat them. You can include them as part of healthy diet or, in the case of this one, the worse your diet is, the bigger the benefits you’ll see…

Joyce Hollman

What are your chances of becoming a supercentenarian?

The oldest living person, Jeanne Calment of France, was 122 when she died in 1997. Seems unbelievable, but new research says living to 125 or even 130 years by the end of this century is well within the realm of possibility. That’s because extreme longevity is on the rise…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

It takes fewer steps than you’d think to live longer

Walking is one of the safest and easiest ways to stay active. It’s also great for your heart health and can help you live longer, reducing your risk of death as much as 32 percent. Better news? Retire your Fitbit… it doesn’t take near as many steps as you’d think…

Virginia Tims-Lawson

Meeting the brain’s energy needs connected to slower aging

The mitochondria found in our cells generate about 95 percent of the body’s energy. As we age, that energy declines. Research has found a connection between the brain’s ability to pull in glucose and the level of energy produced by mitochondria — one that could hold the link to living longer and healthier.