The bacteria that could give you diabetes

Overweight, sedentary, a family history, age…

These factors all add up to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. But that list is missing a very important item…

You see, there is another risk factor that was previously unknown that could cause you to develop blood sugar problems right this very minute — a sneaky bacteria that’s invading your gut.

Here’s why…

Crossing the gut barrier

You are probably familiar with metabolic syndrome, a term for a group of factors that raise a person’s risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. These risk factors include a large waistline, a high triglyceride level (type of fat found in your blood), low HDL (good) cholesterol level, high blood pressure and high fasting blood sugar levels.

Now, previous studies in mice have already shown how unhealthy bacteria could invade the gut lining and promote the inflammation that drives metabolic diseases, specifically type 2 diabetes. And, they decided to test the mechanism in humans.

So, researchers at Georgia State University decided to take a look at the link between metabolic syndrome and bad bacteria in your intestine…

They took two biopsies of the gut mucosa from patients during routine colonoscopies and compared them to each subject’s history of diabetes and gastrointestinal complaints.

They found that those who suffered from blood sugar problems invariably also suffered from bad bacteria encroaching on the mucus-lined covering of their gut.

According to the researchers, this is due to the fact that when bacteria encroach upon host cells, it drives chronic inflammation that interferes with the normal action of insulin, thusly promoting type 2 diabetes

In other words, you need good bacteria in your gut to function normally, or you could end up with diabetes!

Healthy gut, healthy blood sugar

It seems every day we learn new information about the profoundly important role the gut plays in total body health. Clearly, promoting a healthy gut should be a priority if you want to prevent blood sugar problems.

Related: A fountain of youth in your gut

Here are 5 ways you can improve your gut bacteria:

  1. Eat the rainbow – A diverse gut microbiota is a healthy gut microbiota and the way to promote diversity is through eating a wide range of foods. Eat a variety of whole foods in order to improve the health of your gut bacteria. Colorful foods fight disease.
  2. Think fiber – Fiber is food for the good bacteria in your intestines and may even help prevent the growth of disease-causing bacteria. Add plenty of high-fiber foods to your diet like lentils, beans, chickpeas, artichokes, raspberries, green peas and broccoli. Inulin fiber is reported to not only fight diabetes, but work as a natural appetite suppressant.
  3. Don’t forget the fermented foods – One of the healthiest things you can do for your gut microbiome is to eat more fermented foods. These include kefir, kimchi, natto, yogurt, sauerkraut and Kombucha.
  4. Add prebiotic power – We’ve all heard of probiotics – the good bacteria in your gut. Prebiotics, on the other hand, are foods that promote the growth of beneficial microbes in your gut. This list is full of prebiotic foods and their benefits.

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Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

By Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst is a board-certified Doctor of Chiropractic, with more than 20 years of experience. She has dedicated herself to helping others enjoy life at every age through the use of alternative medicine and natural wellness options. Dr. Schmedthorst enjoys sharing her knowledge with the alternative healthcare community, providing solutions for men and women who are ready to take control of their health the natural way.