Is CoQ10 the answer to chronic fatigue syndrome?

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is more than just feeling tired all the time.

It’s a diagnosable condition that can make even the simplest of tasks feel like a monumental effort.

If you think you might have CFS, don’t let anyone tell you it’s “all in your head.” There are answers to be had. And research is uncovering more of them every day.

What is chronic fatigue syndrome?

It’s a complicated disorder where you experience debilitating fatigue for at least six months, fatigue that can’t be explained by any medical condition.

Mental or physical effort increases this fatigue, but rest just doesn’t seem to make it any better. You wake up from sleep feeling just as tired as when you went to bed.

On top of the fatigue that makes it difficult to perform even basic tasks, a person with CFS may also live with:

  • Memory and concentration problems
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Unexplained muscle or joint pain
  • Dizziness, especially when going from lying down to sitting or standing (known as orthostatic hypotension).

What causes chronic fatigue syndrome?

The cause of CFS is unknown. Most experts think that it is triggered by a combination of factors, which could include viral infections and psychological stress.

Some experts believe that a person could be born with a predisposition for CFS and that it is triggered by any number of factors, including immune system problems, hormonal imbalances and emotional trauma.

But a common deficiency is beginning to make itself known among those with CFS…

Chronic fatigue patients have low CoQ10 blood levels

Research has shown that patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have abnormally low levels of CoQ10 in plasma and muscle tissue.

A Belgian study measured levels of the antioxidant CoQ10 in the blood plasma of 58 people diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, and compared it with levels in the blood of 22 healthy participants.

Plasma levels of CoQ10 were significantly lower in people diagnosed with CFS. Nearly half of them (44 percent) had CoQ10 plasma levels lower than the lowest level found in the healthy group.

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CoQ10 Depletion Activates Inflammation

Also, people with extremely low plasma levels of CoQ10 suffered the most from memory and concentration issues.

Research into fibromyalgia, another disease that brings debilitating fatigue, has shown that a CoQ10 deficiency is strongly associated with the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Neither of these findings is surprising when you consider that CoQ10 can help protect our brains from the oxidative stress caused by environmental pollutants and ultimately help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome who were given a daily combination of 200mg of CoQ10 and 20mg of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) for eight weeks reported significantly less fatigue than those who did not take the supplements.

NADH is a natural supplement that boosts energy in our mitochondria and is known to improve mental clarity, concentration and memory.

How to get more CoQ10

CoQ10 is often taken in supplement form. Here are a few things you should know when choosing a CoQ10 supplement.

But CoQ10 is also found in many foods, in a natural form that your body can absorb easily. These foods include:

  • Soybeans
  • Sesame seeds
  • Pistachios
  • Sardines
  • Mackerel
  • Peanuts
  • Liver
  • Spinach
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Canola oil

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Sources:

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients Benefit from CoQ10 — Pharma Nord

Chronic fatigue syndrome —Mayo Clinic

Inflammation Causes Memory Loss and It Starts Sooner Than We Thought —The Ultrawellness Center

Systemic inflammation during midlife and cognitive change over 20 years — Neurology

Joyce Hollman

By Joyce Hollman

Joyce Hollman is a writer based in Kennebunk, Maine, specializing in the medical/healthcare and natural/alternative health space. Health challenges of her own led Joyce on a journey to discover ways to feel better through organic living, utilizing natural health strategies. Now, practicing yoga and meditation, and working towards living in a chemical-free home, her experiences make her the perfect conduit to help others live and feel better naturally.