Virginia Tims-Lawson. FREE Report!

Health Conditions

Latest Stories

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The virus no one wants that could eradicate cancer

When you think of the herpes simplex virus, not much that’s pleasant comes to mind. But what if the virus that can wreak so much havoc could also be used for good, like causing advanced tumors to disappear, shrink or stop progressing?

Joyce Hollman

What’s in your mug could lower your risk for hip fracture

A hip fracture, especially over 60, can be a nightmare. The long period of immobility that follows can bring on dangerous health complications. Calcium and vitamin D are important, but you may be shocked to know how much your coffee or tea habit may help…

Carolyn Gretton

Allergies in the wintertime: Weather as a trigger

For some people, allergies can be an issue year-round. Even when there’s frost on the ground and no pollen in the air, they’re still dealing with sneezing, runny nose and itchy eyes. One allergy expert points to weather as a possible trigger and what may help…

Carolyn Gretton

Why bladder problems increase with age for some women

In the United States, roughly 17 percent of women ages 20 and older suffer from urinary incontinence. While that doesn’t seem like a lot, the number skyrockets as women age. And so does overactive bladder. But why are these conditions worse for some, and where’s the relief?

Miguel Leyva

Glyphosate and thyroid cancer: Too little too late

Research into the causes of thyroid cancer is ongoing, but exposure to pesticides has long been suspected. One, in particular, glyphosate, was associated with a 33 percent increase in cases. 2023 is the year this health destroyer is supposed to be phased out. Is it too little too late?

Joyce Hollman

How to put stress to work for a better brain

Stress is bad for you. Or is it? It certainly has its downsides, like increasing risks for conditions such as nausea, migraine, hypertension, heart disease and even cancer. But all stress is not the same and can, in fact, have the opposite effect…

«SPONSORED»

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The truth about coffee’s effects on heart rhythm

If caffeinated coffee gives your brain a jolt to get you started each morning, might it also give your heart a jolt that causes rhythm problems, like atrial fibrillation? That’s been the subject of debate among doctors and concern for coffee lovers. But has it all been just speculation? After following more than 300,000 coffee lovers for 4 years, we have an answer…

Carolyn Gretton

Vascular dysfunction: A direct path to disease

There appears to be no end to the havoc a poor diet can wreak on the body: the heart, liver, kidneys, blood sugar, and metabolism all suffer… but the damage a bad diet does to your blood vessels provides a direct path for that destruction and more.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Aortic aneurysm: A reason to check blood pressure in both arms

Getting your blood pressure checked is simply a routine procedure to be sure your heart is effortlessly pumping blood like it’s supposed to. But if your doctor is only checking one arm, you could be at higher risk for heart attack, stroke or sudden death and not even know…

Carolyn Gretton

How flavonols put the brakes on memory decline

What’s considered normal memory decline with age is not as disruptive as Alzheimer’s or dementia. But still, who wouldn’t like to maintain strong mental faculties as long as possible? If you’re getting plenty of this nutrient, you’ll keep a sharp brain at any age…

Carolyn Gretton

The condition that can skyrocket your risk for AMD

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is on the rise as the population grows older. And as more is learned about how it can steal our vision, research is also revealing connections to other conditions that can increase the risk of the blinding eye disease even more…

Joyce Hollman

‘Good’ cholesterol’s role as heart health predictor challenged

The fact that “good” cholesterol, AKA HDL cholesterol, is beneficial to heart health is just that, a long-standing fact. But sometimes facts bear re-examining. That’s because HDL may not be the harbinger of heart health we once thought, at least not for everyone.

«SPONSORED»