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Circulation

Latest Stories

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Blood clots linked to COVID’s long-haul symptoms

While most people recover within weeks, many are left with what’s been dubbed long-haul symptoms, lasting weeks to even months beyond the initial infection. The exact cause of the condition now known as long COVID syndrome has been a mystery, until evidence pointed to the dangerous role blood clots play in symptoms that won’t go away…

Carolyn Gretton

Walking significantly raises survival odds after a stroke

Walking is probably one of our favorite forms of exercise. But many hardcore fitness freaks might cast doubt on the benefits of waking a few hours a week. If they are ever unfortunate enough to experience stroke, they may change their minds. Reducing risk of death up to 80 percent is nothing to scoff at…

Carolyn Gretton

Foods that slow brain aging by boosting its blood supply

There are all kinds of tips for keeping your brain sharp as you age, from memory games to meditation to learning new subjects or taking up new hobbies. And we can’t forget sufficient exercise and sleep. But there’s an easier way to improve one of the biggest contributors of age-related cognitive decline… blood flow to the brain.

Virginia Tims-Lawson

Boosting blood oxygen levels may halt early sign of Alzheimer’s

Healthy, oxygenated blood flow is vital. That’s why during a stroke, seconds matter. But a catastrophic event isn’t the only concern when it comes to blood oxygen levels. Research has found that the brain is operating on the bare minimum, even on a good day. On a bad day, it can lead to Alzheimer’s earliest sign…

Easy Health Options Staff

Ischemic, hemorrhagic and mini-stroke: What to know

If there is a lack of blood flow to the brain, the brain is going to starve. That’s why there is ittle time to spare when stroke symptoms arise. Here are the differences between the two main types of stroke as well as TIA or mini-stroke…

Joyce Hollman

No time for heart-healthy exercise? Try a hot bath

Exercise. Either you love it, or you hate it. But it’s proven good preventive medicine. It’s been shown that regular exercise can prevent heart disease, diabetes and even cancer. The good news? There’s an indulgent activity that carries a lot of the same benefits.

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Joyce Hollman

Unexplained swelling could signal a COVID-19 blood clot

What do varicose veins and COVID-19 have in common? They both put you at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis, a condition where a blood clot forms deep within a vein, usually in the legs, but sometimes in the arms. And swelling may be the only sign of the clot and the COVID-19 infection.

Easy Health Options Staff

10 things to know about blood clots

A blood clot is a collection of blood in the body that has changed from liquid to a semi-solid mass. The body does this to stop bleeding when injured, but sometimes a clot forms inside a blood vessel and does not dissolve on its own. Here are 10 things to know about them…

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Cocoa: The drink that protects your heart when you’re stressed

When you’re anxious, your heart rate and blood pressure go up. The function of your arteries is also temporarily impaired. So, what can you do other than try to Zen out or medicate? Tantalize your taste buds with the drink that wards off stress-induced cardiovascular events.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Sex after 60: if you’re not doing it, you should be

Who says sex after 60 stops? If you think you’re supposed to leave all that behind after a certain birthday, you’d be mistaken. Researchers say an active sex life can offer benefits that can make your life more satisfying with age, and they have some tips to help you get it on…

Joyce Hollman

The heart danger that masquerades as vision loss

Strokes don’t only happen in the brain. Retinal artery occlusion is a stroke that happens in the eye. The only symptom may be diminished vision. But an “eye stroke” is considered a medical emergency, meaning minutes count not only to avoid permanent vision loss but to prevent another serious event…

Virginia Tims-Lawson

The truth about HDL: ‘Good cholesterol’ isn’t so good

For years we’ve been told to watch our cholesterol, keeping our so-called “bad” cholesterol down and our “good” cholesterol up. But what if that advice was wrong and we’ve been operating under a false sense of security? There’s much more banking on HDL than we ever realized.

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