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Bone Health

Latest Stories

Jenny Smiechowski

The superstar antioxidant that stops osteoarthritis in its tracks

Osteoarthritis is a pain in the butt, or more accurately, the knee, hip, hand, neck or back. The loss of cartilage in these areas leads to painful bone rubbing that can prevent you from doing all sorts of everyday activities. Unfortunately, doctors can’t help much, but there is a promising antioxidant that not only relieves the pain but could stop osteoarthritis from progressing…

Jenny Smiechowski

Why diabetes is bad for your bones

Diabetes comes with a long list of complications that affect so many parts of your body— your brain, your heart, your eyes, your feet, your skin, your kidneys. And now there’s one more body part to add to that list — your bones.

Joyce Hollman

When weight loss surgery steals your bone density

Diet and exercise can reverse obesity for many. But thousands of people turn to gastric bypass surgery, a more drastic method for losing weight quickly. Unfortunately, the sudden weight loss that comes after such surgery comes with risks of its own…

Joyce Hollman

The vitamin your spine needs the most to battle disc degeneration

It’s February, and if you live in the northern hemisphere, this is the month when you’re most susceptible to a vitamin deficiency that can have far-reaching health consequences, mostly involving your bones. If you’re a woman that makes you especially vulnerable to a perfect storm that sets you up for disc degeneration…

Jenny Smiechowski

Are ‘swiss cheese bones’ behind your low back pain?

About 80 percent of people deal with low back pain, and most of the time, it’s not caused by a strain or injury. A new study from researchers at John Hopkins Medicine may have finally figured out what’s behind our aching backs…

Joyce Hollman

How bad sleep habits age your bones

The evidence is clear: the amount of sleep you get each night is a predictor of your health and of your lifespan. Seven to eight hours is the number you should be shooting for. In fact, numerous studies have enlightened us about the dangers of too little (and too much) sleep. The latest threat? Old bones…

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Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

Why you should be taking vitamin K

More than 75 percent of Americans take vitamins. In the over 35 group, that number goes up to an impressive 81 percent. Yet, with all of the vitamins we’re taking, there’s one that many people don’t know about in spite of multiple clinical studies that have proven the necessity of the vitamin for fighting off age-related concerns.

Jenny Smiechowski

High doses of certain vitamins may put you at risk for hip fractures

A hip fracture is especially serious as you get older. It can mean a loss of mobility and even loss of life. People over 50 who fracture a hip have a much higher risk of death within ten years of their injury. Unfortunately, one certain B supplement can be problematic, especially for women…

Jenny Smiechowski

Is fasting bad for your bones?

Fasting is all the rage. Research shows these diets can slow down aging. Reverse type 2 diabetes. They may even reduce breast cancer risk. But drastically reducing calories long term may have unanticipated effects on certain body parts…

Virginia Tims-Lawson

Why late bloomers may be at higher risk for osteoporosis

If you’re about my age, the beginning of puberty for you was probably a long, long time ago. And, you may be wondering why it even matters now. Well, it matters now, because we’re at the age where our bone strength really matters — a lot.

Joyce Hollman

The hygiene habit that contributes to osteoporosis

It took the FDA 36 years to get this chemical out of our soaps and hand sanitizers. So why has it remained in other products when study after study shows that this chemical is far scarier than the germ it’s meant to protect us from. And, most recently, for the first time, it’s been linked to osteoporosis.

Dr. Adria Schmedthorst

The best walking exercise to kick bone loss to the curb

Without enough estrogen, cells known as osteoblasts aren’t able to make new bone tissue at the level necessary to keep your bones strong. But what you may not know though is that after menopause there’s something that can raise your chances of ending up with weak bones even more — diabetes.

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